Saturday, 31 December 2016

Global Integrity 25

Summary and Summons
A Global Integrity Movement
Moral Wholeness for a Whole World

This entry is very special.
.
This is the 300th entry since the weblog began 10 years ago (December 2006--December 2016). Many thanks Michèle for your input and inspiration to me! This entry is also special because it is both a summary of the global integrity entries and a summons for a global integrity movement. This strategic topic is a capstone marking this 10 year learning journey to share "resources, research, and reflections for good practice."And it reflects my yearnings--and I think lots of people's yearnings throughout the ages--for peaceful, just societies; for well-being for all; for virtuous living; for the better world for which we were created. Ad majorem Dei gloriam. Kelly

Integrity is moral wholeness—living consistently in moral wholeness. Its opposite is corruption, the distortion, perversion, and deterioration of moral goodness, resulting in the exploitation of people. Global integrity is moral wholeness at all levels in our world—from the individual to the institutional to the international. Global integrity is requisite for “building the future we want—being the people we need.” It is not easy, it is not always black and white, and it can be risky. These entries explore the many facets of integrity with a view towards the global efforts to promote sustainable development and wellbeing.
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Summary
Let’s Be the People We Need
We have certainly traversed a variety of terrain in our exploration of integrity at the individual-institutional-international levels. These 25 entries, listed below by title/topic, have helped us to get an initial feel for how global integrity is part of the corporate, faith-based, UN, social, environmental educational, psychological, moral, and philanthropic areas. Three of the overlapping themes that we have regularly encountered on this year-long trek, and which we have endeavored to highlight, can be summarized in these assertions.

--Integrity begins with oneself. Personal transformation is foundational for social transformation.
--Integrity requires external referents and accountability. Trust yourself...but verify, don't self-justify.
--Integrity, with its emphasis on endeavoring to live consistently in moral wholeness, is a core dimension needed in the global efforts for human-planetary wellbeing. There is no development without moral development.

1. Definitions—Global Analysis article (2015), Lausanne Movement
2. United Nations Personnel—UN Competency Development (2010)
3. We Have A Problem—research on leadership qualities, Lausanne Movement
4. Facing Ourselves—Facing Up to the Challenge of Evil and Suffering (2013)
5. Corporate Integrity—United Nations Global Compact, Principle 10: Anti-Corruption
6. Living with Our Deepest Differences—Global Charter of Conscience (2012)
7. Anti-Integrity—personal reflections, Transparency International
8. Corruption Connections—EXPOSED Campaign
9. Hiding Hypocrisy…at all levels—Ten Psychological Tactics for Avoiding Accountability
10. Affirming Integrity...at all levels—Ten Psychological Tactics for Avoiding Accountability
11. Pro-Integrity—Global Declaration Against Corruption, Anti-Corruption Summit: London 2016
12. Education for Global Citizenship—Gyeongju Action Plan (2016), UN DPI/NGO
13. Integrity in Professional Psychology—Universal Ethical Principles for Psychologists (2002), etc.
14. Positive Psychology and Integrity—Authentic Happiness
15. Integrity Needs External Referents—personal reflections
16. Integrity Training—Integrity Action
17. Executive Integrity—Managing Executive Health (2008)
18. Creation Integrity—World Council of Churches, United Nations, Vatican, Earth Charter, Earth Day
19. Public Integrity—Center for Public Integrity
20. Philanthropic Support for Integrity—John Templeton Foundation
21. Christian Integrity—Cape Town Commitment (2010), Lausanne Movement
22. Christian Missional Integrity—Serving Jesus with Integrity (2010)
23. International Anti-Corruption Day
24. Living in Integrity—Trio Gatherings
25. Summary and Summons—A Global Integrity Movement

Summons
Let's Build the World We Want

Global integrity is a multi-level global good. It belongs to us all. But it must be discussed, debated, understood, emphasized, and cultivated. Global integrity does not happen by chance. Rather it takes intentionality to see it take root in our personal, organizational, social, and national lives. Like the character and virtue in which it is embedded, it is refined in the caldron of life’s tough challenges and choices.  

I believe our common identity and shared responsibility as global citizens can be leveraged to "ingtegrate global integrity at  all levels." I believe it is a propritius season to undertake a new (and renewed) joint inititive--a strategic, skilled, relational coalition/alliance that resolutely and unhypocritically emphasizes integrity on behalf of our "precarious, perilous, but precious" world?  Invest in integrity. 

I envision a growing Pro-Integrity Platform that can help to shape and support a sustainable Global Integrity Movement. Some ideas for the entities that could help form such a Platform-Movement are listed below, several of which have been described already in the 25 weblog entries. As for the overall objectives, value-added benefits, relevant products, funding sources, and functional structure that would embody such a global effort for global good…well, that is TBD.

Investing in Integrity: Civil Society
--Templeton Foundation. Character and Virtue Development is one of its four emphases.
https://www.templeton.org/--Caux Foundations—Initiatives for Change.  Caux Forum 2017—Just Governance for Human Security
--Lausanne Movement-Global Integrity Network, Lausanne Movement. https://www.lausanne.org/networks/issues/integrity-and-anti-corruption
(next consultation: in USA April or May 2017)
--Center for Christian Thinking, Biola University. http://cct.biola.edu/
--Trinity Forum. http://ttf.org/ “The Trinity Forum is a nonprofit organization that works to cultivate networks of leaders whose integrity and vision will renew culture and promote human freedom and flourishing.”
--Center for Study of Global Christianity. http://www.gordonconwell.edu/ockenga/research/index.cfm
--International Partnership on Religion and Sustainable Development. http://www.partner-religion-development.org/
--Transparency International. http://www.transparency.org/
--International Anti-Corruption Conferences. https://iaccseries.org/ (17th in December 2016--Panama; 18th in 2018 in--Copenhagen).
--World Bank (see the Integrity Vice Presidency)
--Positive Psychology Center, University of Pennsylvania. http://ppc.sas.upenn.edu/
--Etc.

Investing in Integrity: UN and UN-Related
--UN Office on Crime and Drugs http://www.unodc.org/
--SDG 16, https://sustainabledevelopment.un.org/sdg16 (to be reviewed at the High Level Political Forum in 2019)
--UN Convention Against Corruption. http://www.unodc.org/unodc/en/treaties/CAC/index.html
 (various meetings in UN Vienna)
--UN Anti-Corruption Day (9 December). http://www.anticorruptionday.org/ (theme for 2016: United Against Corruption)
--UN Task Force on Religion and Development (see Engaging Religion and Faith-Based Actors in 2016)
--UN Academic Impact. https://academicimpact.un.org/
-- Etc.
Afterword
I want to note that this vision for a Pro-Integrity Platform--Global Integrity Movement is profoundly influenced by the Global Integration framework (GI) that we have been promoting over the past six years. GI involves actively integrating our lives with global realities by connecting relationally and contributing relevantly on behalf of human wellbeing and the issues facing humanity, in light of our integrity and core values (e.g., ethical, humanitarian, faith-based) for God's glory. Global integration requires global integrity. And both are inseparable for global integrators.

Wednesday, 21 December 2016

Global Integrity--24

Living in Integrity
Moral Wholeness for a Whole World

Marley's Ghost, from Charels Dicken's A Christmas Carol (1843)
“The air was filled with phantoms, wandering hither and thither in restless haste, and moaning as they went. Every one of them wore chains…none were free…The misery with them all was, clearly, that they sought to interfere, for good, in human matters, and had lost the power forever.” 

Integrity is moral wholeness—living consistently in moral wholeness. Its opposite is corruption, the distortion, perversion, and deterioration of moral goodness, resulting in the exploitation of people. Global integrity is moral wholeness at all levels in our world—from the individual to the institutional to the international. Global integrity is requisite for “building the future we want—being the people we need.” It is not easy, it is not always black and white, and it can be risky. These entries explore the many facets of integrity with a view towards the global efforts to promote sustainable development and wellbeing.
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Living in Integrity as Global Citizens
Trio Gathering 16


In this entry we invite you to connect with the recent Trio Gathering at our home. Have a look at how we are engaging in the topic of global integrity with a diverse group of colleagues in the Geneva area.
 

Trio Gatherings (2013-current)
Trio Gatherings provide a relaxed place where colleagues can interact on important topics for mutual learning and support. They are informal and not sponsored by any organization/group. The gatherings are part of our commitment to encourage “global integration”—connecting and contributing relevantly on behalf of the major issues facing humanity and in light of our core values. The hosts (Michèle and Kelly O'Donnell) are consulting psychologists working in the areas of personnel development for international organisations, humanitarian psychology, anti-corruption advocacy/action, and global mental health.

Background and Content
Global citizenship is both a concept and a growing commitment that emphasizes our common identity and responsibility as humans. The Trio Gatherings this year (2016) focused on what it means to be global citizens, including educating global citizens, eradicating poverty, promoting peace, and living in integrity. Four of the main materials we used to guide our interactions: the Gyeongju Action Plan: Education for Global Citizenship (from the UN DPI/NGO), Poverty Inc. (film), materials from Geneva Peace Week, and various materials on integrity (10 pages).

Summary of Trio 16
Saturday 10 December (10:00-13:00) was the date for Trio Gathering 16. Thirteen people from various backgrounds participated (e.g., UN, civil society, health, education, business) The overall theme was Living in Integrity as Global Citizens with the particular focus being Moral Courage. We prepared some concise materials to guide our interactions and in consideration of Sustainable Development Goal 16International Anti-Corruption Day (9 December), and International Human Rights Day (10 December). Our desire was to encourage us all to be people of integrity who as global citizens resolutely do good and courageously oppose corruption at the individual-institutional-international levels.

“Fighting corruption is a global concern because corruption is found in both rich and poor countries, and evidence shows that it hurts poor people disproportionately. It contributes to instability, poverty and is a dominant factor driving fragile countries towards state failure.” UNDP and UNCOC (2016)

We found our group interactions to be very thoughtful and challenging. As the group discussed integrity, we moved beyond more general definitions towards the deeper essence of character, morality, and living congruently with our core values and our “best selves”. We watched a challenging TedxTalk by Mukesh Kapila on Courage or Cowardice, based on his personal struggles and eventual resolve to blow a whistle as a high-level UN official on the atrocities in Sudan.

Take Aways for Michele
1. A message I picked up from our interaction is that character is key to integrity. Integrity is developed over time when we are faithful in the small things, or in other words, when we consistently choose to do the right thing. I wonder what influences subtly erode character, including my character, in contemporary culture, and why?

2. I am struck by the important role of deep reflection, which includes looking back over our lives to see the way forward, when we are at critical crossroads and decision points. I think reviewing the impact (positive and negative) of our personal history and past decisions in this reflection process is instructive and helpful. I want to make more space for reflection in my daily life.

3. Two meaningful quotes from Robert Jackall, Moral Mazes (2010)
“... bureaucratic work causes people to bracket off, while at work, the moralities they might hold outside the workplace... or privately and to follow instead the prevailing morality of their particular organizational situation. As a former vice-president of a large firm says: ‘What is right in the corporation is not what is right in a man’s home or his church. What is right in the corporation is what the guy above you wants from you.’
... Actual organizational moralities are thus contextual, situational, and highly specific, and, most often, unarticulated.”  (2010)

Take Aways for Kelly
1. I was encouraged to hear several talk about the personal challenge/responsibility to live in integrity. And that corruption is not just about the bad people, bad leaders, and bad systems “out there.” A drop of hypocrisy pollutes integrity. But a drop of integrity does not purify hypocrisy. ‘Like a trampled stream and a polluted well so are righteous people who give way before the wicked’ (Proverbs 25:26).

2. I am especially challenged by these quotes from the readings:
--“When we make mistakes, we must calm the cognitive dissonance [inner disharmony between our ideal self and actual self] that jars our feelings of self-worth. And so we create fictions that absolve us of responsibility, restoring our belief that we are smart, moral, and right—a belief that is dumb, immoral, and wrong.” (Tavris and Aronson, 2007)

“The air was filled with phantoms, wandering hither and thither in restless haste, and moaning as they went. Every one of them wore chains…none were free…The misery with them all was, clearly, that they sought to interfere, for good, in human matters, and had lost the power forever.” (Dickens, 1843) 


 Applications
Watch the 14 minute TedxTalk on Courage or Cowardice.
--How can the issues raised support your living in integrity?
--How do the issues raised affect your living in integrity as a global citizen?


Friday, 9 December 2016

Global Integrity 23

International Anti-Corruption Day
Moral Wholeness for a Whole World
Logo for International Anti-Corruption Day 2016
Now in its 14th year

Integrity is moral wholeness—living consistently in moral wholeness. Its opposite is corruption, the distortion, perversion, and deterioration of moral goodness, resulting in the exploitation of people. Global integrity is moral wholeness at all levels in our world—from the individual to the institutional to the international. Global integrity is requisite for “building the future we want—being the people we need.” It is not easy, it is not always black and white, and it can be risky. These entries explore the many facets of integrity with a view towards the global efforts to promote sustainable development and wellbeing.
*****
Today, 9 December, is the UN—and the world community’s—International Anti-Corruption Day. It is a good day (and impetus) to reflect on how each of us can prevent and fight corruption as well as how each of us can cultivate integrity in our spheres of influence, starting with ourselves. The theme this year is “Unite Against Corruption” and it is a tangible expression of Sustainble Development Goal 16 (SDG 16) with its cross-cutting emphases on strong institutions, good governance, peaceful societies, and anti-corruption.

Just as important for the realization of SDG 16 and any effort to confront corruption is the commitment to “Unite for Integrity.” So perhaps it is time for a UN Global Integrity Day. More information about International Anti-Corruption Day is on the official UN site: http://www.anticorruptionday.org/

"Corruption is an issue that affects all countries around the world. It can refer to the destruction of one’s honesty or loyalty through undermining moral integrity or acting in a way that shows a lack of integrity or honesty. It also refers to those who use a position of power or trust for dishonest gain. Corruption undermines democracy, creates unstable governments, and sets countries back economically. Corruption comes in various forms such as bribery, law-breaking without dealing with the consequences in a fair manner, unfairly amending election processes and results, and covering mistakes or silencing whistleblowers (those who expose corruption in hope that justice would be served)."

"By resolution 58/4 of October 31, 2003, the UN General Assembly designated December 9 as International Anti-Corruption Day. This decision aimed to raise people’s awareness of corruption and of the role of the United Nations Convention against Corruption in combating and preventing it. The assembly urged all states and competent regional economic integration organizations to sign and ratify the United Nations Convention against Corruption (UNCAC) to ensure its rapid entry into force. UNCAC is the first legally binding, international anti-corruption instrument that provides a chance to mount a global response to corruption." Source: http://www.timeanddate.com

Thursday, 24 November 2016

Global Integrity 22

Christian Missional Integrity 
Moral Wholeness for a Whole World


Integrity is moral wholeness—living consistently in moral wholeness. Its opposite is corruption, the distortion, perversion, and deterioration of moral goodness, resulting in the exploitation of people. Global integrity is moral wholeness at all levels in our world—from the individual to the institutional to the international. Global integrity is requisite for “building the future we want—being the people we need.” It is not easy, it is not always black and white, and it can be risky. These entries explore the many facets of integrity with a view towards the global efforts to promote sustainable development and wellbeing.
*****
Integrity in Christian Mission

Your throne, God, shall last forever and ever,
your royal sceptre is a sceptre of integrity;
virtue you love as much as you hate wickedness.
Psalm 45:6-7 (cited in Hebrews 1:8-9)

This entry features excerpts from the opening and closing parahgraphs in the Introduction to Serving Jesus with Integrity: Ethics and Accountability in Mission (2010), edited by Dwight Baker and Douglas Hayward. This book's sixteen chapters cover a wide range of important topics realted to integrity, collectively addressing some of the challenges, inconsistencies, guidelines, and virtuous examples that are all intertwined in Christian mission (protestant). It is organized into six parts. Integrity in: 1. Message, Finances, Relationships; 2. Personal Morality; 3. Insitutional Practice; 4. the Field; 5. Recrutment and Representation; and 6. Intentional Accountability. 

My take-away: Misisional integrity, like integrity in any area of work (e.g., business, humanitarian, education, politics), is founded upon personal integrity. And personal inegrity is founded upon moral wholeness.

“But ethical formulations and ethical instruction in themselves are not sufficient. Viewed simply as adherence to rules, ethics falls short. Even apart from our human penchant for evading or overstepping rules, we simply cannot manufacture rules enough…We need to be changed, to become new creatures, if our practice is to change fundamentally….” (p. xii)

“Ethical reflection is never finished. It is an ongoing discussion. In reaching for the ultimate, we are always enmeshed in and struggle with the penultimate, where we need careful thought, consultation with peers and fellow followers of Jesus, and guidelines if we are to make our way reliably and with integrity. As products of mature ethical reflection, codes, and guidelines are useful implements…assisting us in becoming people 'whose faculties have been trained by practice to distinguish good from evil' (Heb. 5:14 NRSV).” (p. xviii)

Applications
--In additon to the "human penchant for evading or overstepping rules," how is integrity affected by the human propensity to lie (intentionally, unconsciously and everything mixed in between), as well as to slant perspectives, memories, and issues in order to cast oneself in a favorable light or avoid scrutiny?

--"We need to be changed..."  Sounds good. But how does this happen?

--What do you do to practically help make your way "reliably and with integrity" in life and in life's challenging ethical situations? 

Saturday, 12 November 2016

Global Integrity 21

Christian Integrity 
Moral Wholeness for a Whole World


Integrity is moral wholeness—living consistently in moral wholeness. Its opposite is corruption, the distortion, perversion, and deterioration of moral goodness, resulting in the exploitation of people. Global integrity is moral wholeness at all levels in our world—from the individual to the institutional to the international. Global integrity is requisite for “building the future we want—being the people we need.” It is not easy, it is not always black and white, and it can be risky. These entries explore the many facets of integrity with a view towards the global efforts to promote sustainable development and wellbeing.
*****
Perspectives from the Lausanne Movement
Cape Town Commitment 2010

Let us strive for a culture of full integrity and transparency.
We will choose to walk in the light and truth of God,
for the Lord tests the heart and is pleased with integrity.
Part 2, IIE. 4

The Lausanne Movement is a major umbrella organization-network of Christians and Christian organizations that was formed over 40 years ago. It is evangelical in its orientation and “connects influencers and ideas for global mission, with a vision of the gospel for every person, an evangelical church for every people, Christ-like leaders for every church, and kingdom impact in every sphere of society.More on its history here:https://www.lausanne.org/about-lausanne

This entry features excerpts from the Lausanne Movement’s Cape Town Commitment (2010). These excerpts call Christians to live with the highest levels of integrity and to resolutely prevent and confront corruption. They also emphasize the dire consequences to the credibility and witness of the church when Christians do not do so. The Movement has about 35 different “networks," with one of them being an “Integrity and Anti-Corruption Network.” This Network has convened meetings over the past few years with a major meeting planned in early 2017. 

PART ONE
7. We Love God’s World
“C.  Such love for the poor demands that we not only love mercy and deeds of compassion, but also that we do justice through exposing and opposing all that oppresses and exploits the poor. ‘We must not be afraid to denounce evil and injustice wherever they exist.’[30] We confess with shame that on this matter we fail to share God’s passion, fail to embody God’s love, fail to reflect God’s character and fail to do God’s will. We give ourselves afresh to the promotion of justice, including solidarity and advocacy on behalf of the marginalized and oppressed...”

9. We Love the People of God
“B) Love calls for honesty. Love speaks truth with grace. No one loved God’s people more than the prophets of Israel and Jesus himself. Yet no one confronted them more honestly with the truth of their failure, idolatry and rebellion against their covenant Lord. And in doing so, they called God’s people to repent, so that they could be forgiven and restored to the service of God’s mission. The same voice of prophetic love must be heard today, for the same reason. Our love for the Church of God aches with grief over the ugliness among us that so disfigures the face of our dear Lord Jesus Christ and hides his beauty from the world – the world that so desperately needs to be drawn to him.”

PART TWO
7. Truth and the Public Arenas
“B) Corruption is condemned in the Bible. It undermines economic development, distorts fair decision-making and destroys social cohesion. No nation is free of corruption. We invite Christians in the workplace, especially young entrepreneurs, to think creatively about how they can best stand against this scourge.”

IID. Discerning the will of Christ...
3. Christ-Centered Leaders
“The rapid growth of the Church in so many places remains shallow and vulnerable, partly because of the lack of discipled leaders, and partly because so many use their positions for worldly power, arrogant status or personal enrichment. As a result, God’s people suffer, Christ is dishonoured, and gospel mission is undermined…”

“B) We renew our commitment to pray for our leaders. We long that God would multiply, protect and encourage leaders who are biblically faithful and obedient. We pray that God would rebuke, remove, or bring to repentance leaders who dishonour his name and discredit the gospel. And we pray that God would raise up a new generation of discipled servant-leaders whose passion is above all else to know Christ and be like him.”

“C) Those of us who are in Christian leadership need to recognize our vulnerability and accept the gift of accountability within the body of Christ. We commend the practice of submitting to an accountability group.”

IIE. Calling the Church of Christ Back to Humility, Integrity and Simplicity
“B) Since there is no biblical mission without biblical living, we urgently re-commit ourselves, and challenge all those who profess the name of Christ, to live in radical distinctiveness from the ways of the world, to ‘put on the new humanity, created to be like God in true righteousness and holiness.’ “

1. Walk in Distinctiveness, as God’s New Humanity
“…The Bible shows that God’s greatest problem is not just with the nations of the world, but with the people he has created and called to be the means of blessing the nations….When there is no distinction in conduct between Christians and non-Christians – for example in the practice of corruption and greed, or sexual promiscuity, or rate of divorce, or relapse to pre-Christian religious practice, or attitudes towards people of other races, or consumerist lifestyles, or social prejudice – then the world is right to wonder if our Christianity makes any difference at all. Our message carries no authenticity to a watching world.”

4. Walk in Integrity, Rejecting the Idolatry of Success
"We cannot build the kingdom of the God of truth on foundations of dishonesty. Yet in our craving for ‘success’ and ‘results’ we are tempted to sacrifice our integrity...Let us strive for a culture of full integrity and transparency. We will choose to walk in the light and truth of God, for the Lord tests the heart and is pleased with integrity."

Applications
--The Cape Town Commitment points out in many places the failure of the church, Christians, and Christian leaders to act with integrity. Give a specific, recent example of how this has happened and the consequences.
--How would you desicribe the components of "a full culture of integrity" as emphasized in the final excerpt above? List a few practical ways to help foster this culture.

Sunday, 30 October 2016

Global Integrity 20

Philanthropic Support for Integrity
Moral Wholeness for a Whole World

φιλανθρωπία
philanthropy: the love of humanity

Integrity is moral wholeness—living consistently in moral wholeness. Its opposite is corruption, the distortion, perversion, and deterioration of moral goodness, resulting in the exploitation of people. Global integrity is moral wholeness at all levels in our world—from the individual to the institutional to the international. Global integrity is requisite for “building the future we want—being the people we need.” It is not easy, it is not always black and white, and it can be risky. These entries explore the many facets of integrity with a view towards the global efforts to promote sustainable development and wellbeing.
*****

John Templeton Foundation
In this entry we feature the Templeton Foundation. If you look into the types of research and initiatives that the Foundation is funding, you will find a grouping (among many) that relates directly to integrity. See examples in the list of projects below--preceded by information on the Foundation’s mission, core funding areas, and a short video on character virtue development.

The Templeton Foundation seeks to do philanthropic work with integrity and among other areas, to support the study and development of integrity through its philanthropy.

Mission
“The John Templeton Foundation serves as a philanthropic catalyst for discoveries relating to the Big Questions of human purpose and ultimate reality. We support research on subjects ranging from complexity, evolution, and infinity to creativity, forgiveness, love, and free will. We encourage civil, informed dialogue among scientists, philosophers, and theologians and between such experts and the public at large, for the purposes of definitional clarity and new insights.”

Core Funding Areas
In the charter establishing his Foundation, the late Sir John Templeton set out his philanthropic intentions under several broad headings. These Core Funding Areas continue to guide our grant making as we work to find world-class researchers and project leaders to share in our pursuit of Sir John’s dynamic, contrarian, forward-looking vision. A number of topics—including creativity, freedom, gratitude, love, and purpose—can be found under more than one Core Funding Area. The Foundation welcomes proposals that bring together these overlapping elements, especially by combining the tools and approaches of different disciplines.”

Science and the Big Questions is the largest of our Core Funding Areas. We support a broad range of programs focused on the universal truths of character development and on the roots of good character in human nature, whether understood from a scientific, philosophical, or religious point of view….”

Video on Funding Character Virtue Development (3.5 minutes)

Seven Funding Examples Related to Integrity (via the site’s search engine):
The Emory Integrity Project: Integrating and Assessing an Integrity Initiative in University Education and Student LifeThe Emory Integrity Project (EIP) is an ambitious plan to transform university culture by establishing integrity as a constant narrative theme in the undergraduate experience. Integrity is a complex idea, but for our purposes reflects 1) a capacity for critical reflection and analysis of the values and ethical considerations in a given moral situation; 2) a practical skill set to determine and implement moral courses of action; and 3) the fortitude to withstand moral scrutiny and pressures to conform. Teaching integrity is a pedagogical challenge in the university setting. The EIP will draw from the literature and expertise on integrity formation in college-aged students, and employ Emory’s history of integrity-based programs, to design and implement campus-wide initiatives and programs to reimagine and refocus Emory’s undergraduate experience. Using curricular and co-curricular strategies, the EIP employs three primary virtues (and many associated virtues) to examine integrity: 1) humility (an affectational posture towards oneself and others characterized by other-regard and a recognition of one’s own imperfections and limitations of knowledge and affect); 2) honor (an affectively and cognitively based capacity to select and apply moral values to moral actions); and 3) helpfulness (an interest in and willingness to assist others in fostering their goals, interests, and aims).”

A Planning Grant for the Achieving with Integrity Project: Early Stage Stage Development of Core Components “The proposed one-year planning grant is to support the early stage development of the Achieving with Integrity (AwI) project, which aims to apply the principles of “reconstructive” character education (Menezes & Campos, 2000) to promote students’ moral awareness, judgment, commitment and action related to academic integrity…”

Leading from Your Spark: A Life of Virtue and Integrity “This project will support the gathering of approximately 30 young people (ages 15-17, equivalent grades of 9-11) from different parts of the world (including potentially, England, China, Russia and the Bahamas) and the United States at Sewanee: The University of the South for a youth leadership summit from June 20, 2012 to June 24, 2012 in association with the Foundation’s anniversary events in Tennessee. The goals of the youth summit are to stimulate and equip participants to identify and tap their own “spark” to make a difference regarding an issue or concern about which they are passionate, introduce participants to 21st Century collaborative leadership strategies and skills, engage participants in a practical project that stimulates growth and learning while also preparing them for leadership in their own schools and communities, and create a supportive learning community among diverse participants that can be sustained beyond the event via social media.”

Increasing Scientific Openness and IntegrityAn academic scientist’s professional success depends on publishing. Publishing norms emphasize novel, positive, tidy results. As such, disciplinary incentives encourage design, analysis, and reporting decisions that maximize publishability even at the expense of accuracy. This challenges scientists' character because professional success is enhanced by pursuing suboptimal scientific practices. As such, disciplinary norms guide researchers toward practices that are contrary to personal and scientific values. The end result is inflation of error in published science, and interference with knowledge accumulation. Scientific integrity can be improved with strategies that make the fundamental but abstract accuracy motive—getting it right—competitive with the more tangible and concrete incentive—getting it published.”

Exploring the Role of Virtues in Determining Organizational Culture: A Planning ProposalOrganizational culture has been well researched. But the ethical culture of organizations—what we call the “culture of integrity”—remains relatively unexamined. This project is important because the time is right, the Institute’s cumulative work to date will inform our findings, and we strongly believe that integrity underpins organizational culture. This revised application is for a one-year planning grant to begin to determine the role of virtues within organizations. Specifically, are there core virtues critical to the ethical operation of an organization? Can these be identified, studied, and re-combined to create a model for a culture of integrity? To answer these questions, we propose to update our review of the literature, identify best-practice examples of ethical organizations, profile select organizations, and synthesize our findings. Based on this work, we hope to develop a hypothesis on the role of virtues in determining organizational culture and a proposal for researching that hypothesis. We expect to find that virtues are important in creating positive cultures, to identify those virtues most critical to that end, and to gather evidence for proposing a cultures-of-integrity model.”

Honesty - Building a Virtuous CycleFrom plagiarism, to infidelity, to financial fraud, dishonesty seems to be a universal part of the world we live in. This not only affects our sense of security and comfort, but also discourages innovation and growth at the personal, professional, and societal level. We have spent the last few years exploring this topic through the (Dis)Honesty Project and a number of different initiatives: the documentary feature film “(Dis)Honesty – The Truth About Lies,” a traveling installation called the Truth Box, and the project’s digital properties including its own website. We aim to broaden the project’s impact by extending its educational work and creating targeted wraparound programming that engages individuals around the topics of honesty, integrity, and trust in the contexts of their lives. The programs encourage character development through dialogue, demonstrations, and periodic reminders. With the support the John Templeton Foundation, we will a) provide licenses for our film and its complementary curriculum to schools and universities who otherwise could not afford them; b) produce talkback discussions around the film for professional associations that initiate meaningful exploration of dishonesty and ethical culture within particular industries; and c) create and test a new approach to ethics training in organizational settings that facilitates discussions around dishonesty and provides periodic, consistent reminders to strengthen an ethical culture. Through these programs, we can help individuals develop, value, and maintain an honest, virtuous character and establish mechanisms and precedents that support this endeavor, ultimately creating a virtuous cycle that advances honesty, integrity and trust in the communities in which we live and work.”

Planning Grant: A New, Holistic Paradigm for Undergraduate STEM Education: Inspiring Big Questions by Cultivating Virtuous ScientistsAs universities have become more professionalized, a need has emerged to establish mechanisms to restore open inquiry in science education. There is also a need to provide an experience that exceeds the perceived limits of human thought while fostering the boundless creativity and dynamism made possible by human imagination and intellect. Through this planning grant, we will develop a three-year implementation project to establish a new STEM educational experience that will cultivate a habit of open-minded inquiry, develop those virtues needed for substantive intellectual progress, and equip students with the tools needed to actively create rather than passively absorb knowledge.”

Two Previous Funding Examples
Positive Psychology Center, University of Pennsylvaniahttps://www.templeton.org/what-we-fund/grants/positive-psychology-research
--“Description: These grants helped to establish the Positive Psychology Center. Positive Psychology is the study of the strengths and virtues that enable individuals and communities to thrive. The Center promotes research, training, and education. The field of Positive Psychology is founded on the belief that people want to lead meaningful and fulfilling lives, to cultivate what is best within themselves, and to enhance their experiences of love, work, and play.
--Grant Amount: $2,199,500   Start Date: January 2001  End Date: August 2007”

Center for Christian Thought, Biola University
--“Description: Though there are a multitude of Christian scholars in different fields working on the Big Questions – those questions of perennial human concern about how we should live, what is real, what is beautiful, what is good – there are few resources in the Christian academic world for enabling interdisciplinary, collaborative work on these questions, and fewer yet for translating such scholarship into formats accessible to a broader, non-academic audience. Biola University's Center for Christian Thought (CCT) will capitalize on this opportunity with the following main activities: Residential Fellowships and visiting-scholar appointments to facilitate sustained, interdisciplinary, collaborative research; Three RFPs, each focused on a timely Big Question; Dedicated staff and web resources for the translation of this scholarship to broad non-academic audiences; Yearly interdisciplinary conferences; Pastor-in-residence program and regular pastors; luncheons; Annual course-development competition; Public lectures and accessible resources translating scholarly work on the Big Questions to broad, non-academic audiences; Well-designed and well-networked website that will feature the work of the Center Expected outputs and outcomes include: 12 book manuscripts, 36 journal articles, 3 edited volumes, 3 special-theme journal issues, 135 conference-paper submissions, 12 podcasts, 30 brief video interviews, 6 new courses developed, 12 multi-view papers, 6 sermon series; 65 emerging and established scholars networked, 3 conferences, 600 pastor-attendees at 3 pastors' luncheons, 6 senior-scholar public lectures with 600 attendees. Plausible enduring impacts include: Increased emphasis on interdisciplinary approaches to the Big Questions among Christian scholars; Decreased anti-intellectualism in evangelical Christian culture; Significant progress in knowledge concerning our three focal themes.
--Grant Amount: $3,029,221   Start Date: July 2012   End Date: June 2015”


Thursday, 13 October 2016

Global Integrity 19

Public Integrity
Moral Wholeness for a Whole World


Image source: Watchdog RI website
http://watchdogri.org/

Integrity is moral wholeness—living consistently in moral wholeness. Its opposite is corruption, the distortion, perversion, and deterioration of moral goodness, resulting in the exploitation of people. Global integrity is moral wholeness at all levels in our world—from the individual to the institutional to the international. Global integrity is requisite for “building the future we want—being the people we need.” It is not easy, it is not always black and white, and it can be risky. These entries explore the many facets of integrity with a view towards the global efforts to promote sustainable development and wellbeing.
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Center for Public Integrity
https://www.publicintegrity.org/

This entry focuses on "public integrity" which we define as the right and responsibility of citizens to join together in order to monitor, promote, and protect integrity in its communities, institutions, and governments. We share one example of a USA-focussed organization that we have heard about although not connected with personally (e.g., to better understand its emphases/orientations). The quotes below are from the organization's website.

"The Center for Public Integrity was founded in 1989...[and is one of the USA's] oldest and largest nonpartisan, nonprofit investigative news organizations and winner of the 2014 Pulitzer Prize for investigative journalism. Our mission: To serve democracy by revealing abuses of power, corruption and betrayal of public trust by powerful public and private institutions, using the tools of investigative journalism....The Center’s editorial staff consists of journalists, [Freedom of Information Act] experts, copy editors, researchers, fact-checkers and data experts who work on the Center’s investigative projects and stories. The Center distributes its investigations through its award-winning website and to all forms of media; broadcast, print, online, and blogs, around the globe."

"The Center...focuses its investigations on the following areas: money and politics, government waste/fraud/abuse, the environment, healthcare reform, national security and state government transparency.  We have won more than 50 major journalism awards, including the Pulitzer Prize, the George Polk Award and numerous honors from the Investigative Reporters and Editors, the Online News Association, Overseas Press Club, Society of Environmental Journalists and the Society of Professional Journalists."

Applications
--Have a look at the Center's website. What is one area in particular that interests you?
--How is this type of public service-integrity center present in other countries besides the USA? It would be good to see a list! 

Wednesday, 28 September 2016

Global Integrity 18

Creation Integrity
Moral Wholeness for a Whole World


Integrity is moral wholeness—living consistently in moral wholeness. Its opposite is corruption, the distortion, perversion, and deterioration of moral goodness, resulting in the exploitation of people. Global integrity is moral wholeness at all levels in our world—from the individual to the institutional to the international. Global integrity is requisite for “building the future we want—being the people we need.” It is not easy, it is not always black and white, and it can be risky. These entries explore the many facets of integrity with a view towards the global efforts to promote sustainable development and wellbeing.
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‘Creation Integrity” refers to the wholeness and health of the world—nature--of which humans of course are part. It requires humans having integrity at all levels (global integrity) in order to preserve the integrity of the earth. Here are seven items/quotes over the past 25 years that deal with this important topic: our integrity for creation integrity. Some also represent movements that have merged and morphed into other earth-ecological emphases. Note: See also World Day of Creation  on 1 September--short video message from Desmond Tutu

World Council of Churches (written in early 1990s, quote from website)
“Over the years, an emerging conviction that justice, peace and creation are bound together has found expression in such World Council of Churches' study and action programmes as the Just, Participatory and Sustainable Society (JPSS), the conciliar process for Justice, Peace and the Integrity of Creation (JPIC) and…the Theology of Life (TOL) programme. The quest, in the 1970s, for a "just, participatory and sustainable society" was a response to growing recognition of the persistence of poverty and misery and of the limits of and threats to the earth's capacity to sustain human life. Between its sixth (1983) and seventh (1991) assemblies, the WCC appealed to the churches to make public commitments and undertake common action on the threats to life in the areas of justice, peace and integrity of creation as part of the essence of what it means to be the church. Since 1991, this effort has centred on articulating a "theology of life".  In a series of 22 case studies, local groups from around the world have examined one of ten affirmations made by a 1990 world convocation on JPIC, and have sought to understand both what it implied in their own context and how these local elements fit into a global analysis. These programmes, each of which built on the insights of its predecessor, sought to encourage the churches to make costly commitments to justice, peace and creation. They also sought to identify and make the connections visible, and to encourage churches to keep them in mind when addressing justice, peace and creation issues.”

World Council of Churches (current, quote from the website)
“The WCC has a long tradition of addressing the links between Justice, Peace and Integrity of Creation. Today, this approach is applied and updated in regard to some of the most urgent global challenges. The WCC work on eco-justice is implemented through the Ecumenical Water Network, the Climate Justice project and the Poverty, Wealth and Ecology project.

Eco-justice – what is that? The “eco” prefix comes from the Greek word oikos for “house” and is part of the etymological roots of economy and ecology, but also ecumenism. In linking environmental and social justice issues the environmental justice approach, “eco-justice” in short, challenges both humanity’s destruction of the earth and the abuse of economic and political power which result in poor people having to suffer the effects of environmental damage.”

Pope Francis (2016)
“13. The urgent challenge to protect our common home includes a concern to bring the whole human family together to seek a sustainable and integral development, for we know that things can change. The Creator does not abandon us; he never forsakes his loving plan or repents of having created us. Humanity still has the ability to work together in building our common home. Here I want to recognize, encourage and thank all those striving in countless ways to guarantee the protection of the home which we share. Particular appreciation is owed to those who tirelessly seek to resolve the tragic effects of environmental degradation on the lives of the world’s poorest. Young people demand change. They wonder how anyone can claim to be building a better future without thinking of the environmental crisis and the sufferings of the excluded.

14. I urgently appeal, then, for a new dialogue about how we are shaping the future of our planet. We need a conversation which includes everyone, since the environmental challenge we are undergoing, and its human roots, concern and affect us all. The worldwide ecological movement has already made considerable progress and led to the establishment of numerous organizations committed to raising awareness of these challenges. Regrettably, many efforts to seek concrete solutions to the environmental crisis have proved ineffective, not only because of powerful opposition but also because of a more general lack of interest. Obstructionist attitudes, even on the part of believers, can range from denial of the problem to indifference, nonchalant resignation or blind confidence in technical solutions. We require a new and universal solidarity. As the bishops of Southern Africa have stated: “Everyone’s talents and involvement are needed to redress the damage caused by human abuse of God’s creation”. All of us can cooperate as instruments of God for the care of creation, each according to his or her own culture, experience, involvements and talents.”

Earth Charter Initiative (2000, current)
 “The Earth Charter Initiative is a global movement of organizations and individuals that embrace
the Earth Charter and use it to guide the transition towards a more just, sustainable, and peaceful world.” (quote from website)

“We stand at a critical moment in Earth's history, a time when humanity must choose its future. As the world becomes increasingly interdependent and fragile, the future at once holds great peril and great promise. To move forward we must recognize that in the midst of a magnificent diversity of cultures and life forms we are one human family and one Earth community with a common destiny. We must join together to bring forth a sustainable global society founded on respect for nature, universal human rights, economic justice, and a culture of peace. Towards this end, it is imperative that we, the peoples of Earth, declare our responsibility to one another, to the greater community of life, and to future generations. Earth, Our Home Humanity is part of a vast evolving universe. Earth, our home, is alive with a unique community of life. The forces of nature make existence a demanding and uncertain adventure, but Earth has provided the conditions essential to life's evolution. The resilience of the community of life and the well-being of humanity depend upon preserving a healthy biosphere with all its ecological systems, a rich variety of plants and animals, fertile soils, pure waters, and clean air. The global environment with its finite resources is a common concern of all peoples. The protection of Earth's vitality, diversity, and beauty is a sacred trust. (excerpt from Preamble)

Ecological Integrity [4 of the 16 Principles in the Charter]
--5. Protect and restore the integrity of Earth's ecological systems, with special concern for biological diversity and the natural processes that sustain life.
--6. Prevent harm as the best method of environmental protection and, when knowledge is limited, apply a precautionary approach.
--7. Adopt patterns of production, consumption and reproduction that safeguard Earth's regenerative capacities, human rights and community well-being.
--8. Advance the study of ecological sustainability and promote the open exchange and wide application of the knowledge acquired.”

Earth Day Network (quote from website)
“Earth Day Network’s mission is to broaden and diversify the environmental movement worldwide and to mobilize it as the most effective vehicle to build a healthy, sustainable environment, address climate change, and protect the Earth for future generations. Growing out of the first Earth Day, Earth Day Network is the world’s largest recruiter to the environmental movement, working with more than 50,000 partners in 196 countries to build environmental democracy. We work through a combination of education, public policy, and consumer campaigns.

The first Earth Day on April 22, 1970, activated 20 million Americans from all walks of life and is widely credited with launching the modern environmental movement. The passage of the landmark Clean Air ActClean Water ActEndangered Species Act and many other groundbreaking environmental laws soon followed. Twenty years later, Earth Day went global, mobilizing 200 million people in 141 countries and lifting environmental issues onto the world stage. More than 1 billion people now participate in Earth Day activities each year, making it the largest civic observance in the world.”

United Nations (2015) (excerpt below from text of the agreement)
“The Parties to this Agreement,
--Being Parties to the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change, hereinafter referred to as "the Convention"
--…being guided by its principles, including the principle of equity and common but differentiated responsibilities and respective capabilities, in the light of different national circumstances….
--Emphasizing the intrinsic relationship that climate change actions, responses and impacts have with equitable access to sustainable development and eradication of poverty,
--Recognizing the fundamental priority of safeguarding food security and ending hunger, and the particular vulnerabilities of food production systems to the adverse impacts of climate change,
--Taking into account the imperatives of a just transition of the workforce and the creation of decent work and quality jobs in accordance with nationally defined development priorities,
--Acknowledging that climate change is a common concern of humankind, Parties should, when taking action to address climate change, respect, promote and consider their respective obligations on human rights, the right to health, the rights of indigenous peoples, local communities, migrants, children, persons with disabilities and people in vulnerable situations and the right to development, as well as gender equality, empowerment of women and intergenerational equity,
--Recognizing the importance of the conservation and enhancement, as appropriate, of sinks and reservoirs of the greenhouse gases referred to in the Convention,
--Noting the importance of ensuring the integrity of all ecosystems, including oceans, and the protection of biodiversity, recognized by some cultures as Mother Earth, and noting the importance for some of the concept of "climate justice", when taking action to address climate change,
--Affirming the importance of education, training, public awareness, public participation, public access to information and cooperation at all levels on the matters addressed in this Agreement,
--Recognizing the importance of the engagements of all levels of government and various actors, in accordance with respective national legislations of Parties, in addressing climate change,
--Also recognizing that sustainable lifestyles and sustainable patterns of consumption and production, with developed country Parties taking the lead, play an important role in addressing climate change,

Have agreed as follows:” [29 Articles, 27 pages]

United Nations (2015)
“This Agenda is a plan of action for people, planet and prosperity. It also seeks to strengthen universal peace in larger freedom. We recognise that eradicating poverty in all its forms and dimensions, including extreme poverty, is the greatest global challenge and an indispensable requirement for sustainable development. All countries and all stakeholders, acting in collaborative partnership, will implement this plan. We are resolved to free the human race from the tyranny of poverty and want and to heal and secure our planet. We are determined to take the bold and transformative steps which are urgently needed to shift the world onto a sustainable and resilient path. As we embark on this collective journey, we pledge that no one will be left behind. The 17 Sustainable Development Goals and 169 targets which we are announcing today demonstrate the scale and ambition of this new universal Agenda….

--Goal 6. Ensure availability and sustainable management of water and sanitation for all
--Goal 13. Take urgent action to combat climate change and its impacts.
--Goal 14. Conserve and sustainably use the oceans, seas and marine resources for sustainable development
--Goal 15. Protect, restore and promote sustainable use of terrestrial ecosystems, sustainably manage forests, combat desertification, and halt and reverse land degradation and halt biodiversity loss."
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Applications
--Which of the above items would you like to study further?